RECIPES

Mandarin Marmalade

This is quite seriously one of the simplest, most basic recipes ever. I’d never made marmalade before last weekend – but with the Kodicek Clan rolling up with jars for days, all needing to be filled with “something” for their school fair…marmalade we did! We also pumpkin chutneyed (that recipe is floating around elsewhere on this site – it’s a cracker!). I was pleasantly surprised – I’m not a huge fan of the overly bitter marmalades made with the classic Seville oranges, but the beautiful sweet mandarins around at the moment seem to add an extra zest and lightness. So good on toasted sourdough! Added bonus of buying all mandarins from local honesty stall. I highly recommend having a go.

Mandarin Marmalade

Makes about 2 .5 kg

12 whole sweet mandarins

4 lemons, juiced

Caster sugar

Put the whole mandarins (yes, skin on)  and lemon juice into a large pot big enough to hold them all and barely cover with water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and cook until the mandarins are completely soft and just starting to break apart. Remove the mandarins from the pot (retain the liquid) and set about removing the seeds. While they are still hot, I do this by tearing them apart with 2 pair of small tongs and just lifting the seeds out – not a completely painful exercise but it does take a little patience. If seedless mandarins are  an option – go there.

Discard the seeds and puree all the remaining mandarin pieces, skin and all; it doesnt need to be completely smooth – you will still see pieces of skin and flesh (as you do in marmalade).

Add the puree back to the water and take a complete measurement of the fruit and water mixture combined. You are now going to add exactly the same amount of sugar to this mixture – so if you have 1 litre of fruit/ water, then add 1kg of sugar .

Place the pot back on a medium-high heat and bring to the boil, stirring all the time to dissolve the sugar. Keeping on a steady, constant boil, cook for about 20 minutes then do the setting point test. I use the ‘flake test’ (see below). Once setting point is reached, remove the marmalade from the heat and leave to cool for 10 minutes.

Pour into hot sterilised jars and seal straight away.

The flake test

When you are close to setting point, take a tablespoon of the jam or marmalade with a metal spoon and leave it to cool a little. Now tilt the spoon on it’s side and pour the mixture onto a plate. If the marmalade drips in a solid sheet, it is ready. If it falls in drips then you are not quite there yet. 

16 Responses to “Mandarin Marmalade”

  1. Bree

    This is a wonderful recipe! Made it yesterday :) I just threw 3 whole lemons in and treated them like mandarins, and it came out lovely! Thank you for sharing.

    Reply
    • 100miletable

      Bree this is an extraordinarily late reply as I have been remiss at looking at the comments on my site. My apologies for that. Thank you SO much for the terrific feedback. This recipe is proving really popular which is amazing! Have a great week, Sarah.

      Reply
  2. Hazel W

    Looking forward to trying this tomorrow! Got any lime recipes? My friend keeps giving my her produce and I am running out of storage containers!! Help! Any ideas for Lemonade Fruit? Hazel – Upper Coomera Qld

    Reply
    • Hazel W

      Made 5 very delicous jars of golden marmalade! Thank you – will be making this one again. I took seeds out the next day after fruit had completed first cook until soft. Easy to remove pips when cold. Also cheated and used CSR Jam Setting Sugar. Perfect jelly set. Yum.

      Reply
      • 100miletable

        Hazel…thanks again. That’s a great tip on removing the seeds. I’ll do that next time. Weather is rubbish here right now so as soon as I can get the courage up to venture out Im off to the mandarin stall on McCauley’s Lane! Have a great week, Sarah

        Reply
        • Carmel

          Made this and let mandarins cool and then removed seeds …Wow fantastic recipe will use it again with other fruit containing seeds …the limit is ones imagination Thank you Novice jam maker

          Reply
    • 100miletable

      Hazel have a look for the lime cordial on my site if that is your thing – it is DELICIOUS!!!! Remnds me of the cordial my grandmother made when I was a kid and I make it all the time. The zesting of the skins can be a bit tedious so a good jpb for when watching the news :). I think lemonades would work perefctly here as well…

      Reply
  3. Elise

    Just made this and it tastes fantastic. I threw in a dozen kumquats that were off my little tree and also a couple of limes. I am looking forward to using it in the next Bread and Butter Pudding I make, just perfect for this cooler weather :) thanks for sharing this super easy recipe. Elise – Cairns

    Reply
    • 100miletable

      Elise – a little late with my reply but thank you and I bet that bread and butter pudding was absolutely AMAZING!

      Reply
  4. Kirsty

    Ive never made marmalade like this before, looks delicious. I’m a big fan of cumquat marmalade which I imagine might have a similar flavour.

    Reply
  5. Sheila

    Greetings from Brisbane! I came across your site by accident, after googling “Mandarin marmalade”, and I’m so glad I did. I followed your instructions exactly (although I took a hint from Hazel, and de-seeded them when cold) and the end result was a perfectly set, and beautifully flavoured marmalade. Thank you so much!

    Reply
    • 100miletable

      Sorry for the late response Sheila but so glad you have tapped into this recipe. I love it!

      Reply
  6. Carolyn, uk

    Have been researching mandarin marmalade recipes online and for some reason everyone seems to make it so complicated compared to normal marmalades and jams eg removing pith! Why? Was about to make as a usual marmalade so really pleased to find your recipe which has confirmed that mandarins don’t need to be treated differently! Now going to set to and use my 2 kg of mandarins, may add some fresh grated ginger too at the end- thank you. Will let you know how I get on.

    Reply
  7. Denise

    When looking for recipes to use an overloaded mandarin tree was happy to come across this recipe. putting to the test in a couple of days when I get help to reach the fruit on an over size tree (about 15 foot high. Thank you for posting it out there to find. Denise.

    Reply

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